Overview

Widespread insecurity, high levels of violence, and food insecurity have displaced many people inside and across Honduras’ borders. An estimated 190,000 Hondurans are internally displaced due to conflict and violence, and 124,818 have filled for asylum applications between 2007 and 2017. ?

In October 2018, between 7,000 and 10,000 migrants left Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala to form two large caravans and multiple smaller groups travelling by foot towards the United States border. A smaller caravan headed North between 14 and 30 January 2019. Migrants are on the move to escape violence and persecution, improve their economic situation, or be reunited with their families. Around 12,600 migrants have crossed borders or are now residing irregularly in Guatemala or Mexico. ?

Honduras is part of Central America’s ‘Dry Corridor’ and experiences irregular rainfall and prolonged periods of drought, leading to major crop losses and food insecurity. An El Niño episode is expected to affect Honduras in the first seven months of 2019, exacerbating an already precarious food security and nutrition situation, especially for rural communities. ?

Key figures

  • 267,000 people projected to be in IPC 3 (Crisis) and 4 (Emergecy) levels of food insecurity between March and May 2019  [?]
  • 60 % of the population of Honduras living in poverty  [?]
  • 3,285 homicides in 2018  [?]

Key priorities

Food Security and livelihoods: The arrival of an El Niño episode in the beginning of 2019 leading to below average rains will have an impact on food availability, in particular for impoverished rural communities relying on agricultural livelihoods. ?

Protection: High levels of gang-violence and other criminal activities drive displacement in the Northern Triangle, where homicide rates are among the highest in the world. ?